Forced labor of 800,000 U.S. prisoners creates $10 billion in economic output annually

A 2022 study by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the University of Chicago found that the roughly 800,000 prisoners in the United States generate $10 billion in economic value annually, with more than $2 billion of that coming from serving clients outside the prison system.

A 2022 study by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the University of Chicago found that the approximately 800,000 prisoners in the United States generate $10 billion in economic value annually, with more than $2 billion coming from serving clients outside the prison system.
However, a new class-action lawsuit reveals a reality: Many American prisoners claim that they are \”forced labor.\”
According to a report by Bloomberg on Saturday (11th), Lakiera Walker, who was recently paroled after 15 years in prison, filed a class-action lawsuit with nine plaintiffs who are still in prison, as well as some well-known labor lawyers and unions.
They are suing Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, the state’s attorney general, the prison commissioner and companies they say rely on forced labor, including Hyundai supplier Ju-Young and franchisees of KFC, McDonald’s (MCD-US) and Wendy’s.
The workers who filed the lawsuit, all black, claimed they wanted to abolish \”modern slavery\”.
Prison labor touches every corner of American life: from former slave plantations in Louisiana to equipment in high school auditoriums in Massachusetts to Russell Stover chocolate production in Kansas and Department of Motor Vehicles customer service in New York.
During the height of the COVID-19 epidemic, prisoners even participated in hospital laundry, mask production, and grave excavation.
Public documents show that Utah’s prison labor agency has provided goods or services to hundreds of civilian clients over the past decade, including the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), Cold Stone Creamery, The Nature Conservancy, Smithfield Foods, and the Sundance Film Festival.
An Associated Press investigation earlier this year found prison labor in the supply chains of well-known companies such as Cargill, Coca-Cola (KO-US), Kroger, Target, and Walmart (WMT-US). figure.
Inmates sometimes get paid less than a dime to work for their own prisons, compared to about $2 an hour working for a private company.
(Partners are not allowed to reprint this article)

Like (0)
Previous May 14, 2024 9:41 am
Next May 15, 2024 9:49 am

Related posts